Our goals for 2020

Updated: Mar 12


This is Nathan writing today. Through our writing we periodically share out goals for the year, reflect on our past goals, and cover what went right or wrong. This is another of those posts, but this time I want to also share how we balance everything, not just how we focus on our fitness goals. Balancing all aspects of life is something every person must do. While some people do not believe in work-life balance, every day a person balances all aspects of his or her life, including work, family, and other area such as health and fitness. Whether we call it work-life balance or just life, the balancing act is still present. We are no exception. For this writing I am going to speak mostly from my point of view and note how I balance focusing on my goals, work tasks, and life tasks. Goals for the future Let us start with goals, since from a goal is how we develop a plan of action. For me I have three categories of goals:

  • Work

  • Fitness

  • Family

Work and fitness are likely straight forward, but when I note family, I include all goals that do not fall into work or fitness. This includes relationship goals, financial goals not related to the business (though overlap occurs since work/home finances are connected), and personal goals such as self-improvement (this is the mental/emotional side, not physical, as that is fitness). This classifications of goals is important, as it assists with prioritization and planning. Work For 2020 I have a few straightforward, even simplistic, goals that will take a lot of hard work and planning. Those goals are:

  • Double business income

  • Improve marketing

  • 100% client satisfaction

All of these are ongoing goals and have a depth and breath that cannot be conveyed simply by noting them as goals. For example, marketing tasks include SEO, social media, website development, and other tasks, such as email marketing. I spearhead the overall marketing process and most projects, but outsource individual tasks or micro projects. Fitness In the coming year my main goal is to keep working out with the intensity I have shown in previous years. By doing so, my abilities will improve. My focus is not on singular goals as it has been in previous years, though achieving some abilities would be nice. These are:

  • Maintain current strength, such as squat and deadlift one rep max remaining between 400-500 pounds

  • Increase strength such as achieving a 400-pound front squat or 300-pound clean

  • Maintain or improve other performance metrics, such as speed, distance ran, handstand hold duration, etc.

This is non-specific, but that reflects back on my statement that my main goal is to keep working out with the intensity I have shown in previous years. I am fit, lean, and happy with both. If my fitness were to decline, it would be an annoyance, but not a significant issue, as I would still be fit and lean. That said, I will continue to push myself in the gym as well as focus on nutrition, recovery, and stress management, meaning I will see improvements in fitness. As long I see general improvement, such as small increases in speed, strength, and skill over time, then I will be happy. Family My ongoing goal for family is to maintain or improve family life. The main aspect of this is the relationship with my wife and youngest daughter Amelia, as the three of us live in the same home and interact daily. At the same time, I have personal improvement goals and household financial goals. To keep things simple, the goals are:

  • Maintain a healthy relationship with Grace and Amelia

  • Continue to improve myself as a person

  • Continue to build our wealth

Maintaining a good relationship means being a good father and husband, but also expecting Grace and Amelia to be good to me. This includes all of us communicating, making honest effort to not be A-holes, and for all of us to spend quality time together. Continuing to improve myself means remembering my shortcomings and continuing to keep them in check everyday, while at the same time determining if there are other areas in which I can improve. Building wealth on a continuous basis means increasing income, spending wisely, and investing money in the future. Examples are doubling business income over the next couple years, minimizing spending on things we do not need, and investing an additional $150,000+ in the coming years The plan to make this happen Balancing out these goals in order to successfully achieve them all requires a plan. That plan must be goal driven, thought out, and structured. It cannot be a randomly approached plan, a wing it approach, or a “things will just work out” frame of mind. Success requires effort, and part of that effort is having a good plan. We have plans for each category—work, family, and fitness—as well as an overarching plan for all. I am the planner in our household, many I put in the “footwork” of researching and planning, but Grace and I, with input from third-parties where applicable, make the final decisions. When there is a question, we default to my judgement. Plans are like anything in life—flexibility is key. We have a structure, such as a rolling five-year budget, but understand that things will be modified along the way, such as adjusting for new projects that arise. Work For better or worse, the work goals fuel our ability to focus on fitness and family goals, at least to some degree. The more successful we are at business, the more we can focus on fitness and family, since money is not as much of a concern. Our work goals are:

  • Double business income

  • Improve marketing

  • 100% client satisfaction

To double business income, we focus on improved marketing and 100% client satisfaction. There are other tasks that take place, such as accounting, administrative tasks such as record keeping, etc., but those tasks are largely satisfactory as is. Our client satisfaction is as well, as most clients are happy with their results (this is part of the reason we have some clients with us for 3+ years). That said, client satisfaction is not 100% and likely never will be, but it is something for which we strive. We focus on client satisfaction by providing a quality service at an affordable price and delivering what we say we will. We pay attention to the unique demands of each client, work with them to create and maintain programs that are effective but also fit their situation (schedule, etc.), and effectively communicate with the client to adapt the program over time to his or her changing goals, needs, schedule, etc. We are not marketers and learning in this area has been paramount as has working with marketing professionals. Currently, we work with an SEO agency, a social media marketing agency, outsource work to contractors, and use software to maximize our marketing potential within our marketing budget. Through these efforts we have seen steady growth in online presence, though in some areas more than others at certain points. This exposure is what put in font our clients and potential clients, such as you, and allows us to communicate our message. The ongoing approach is to continue our diverse marketing strategy, to focus on providing the best service reasonably possible to client, and through these efforts, double our business income. The exact details or the tasks are beyond the scope of sharing here, but the above is idea of where our focus in these areas lie. Fitness Fitness is supremely important to me on a personal level, but also on a business level. I have a responsibility to “show and prove” my fitness to help sell our services, while at the same time simply enjoying working out and reaping the benefits. My fitness goals are:

  • Maintain current strength, such as squat and deadlift one rep max remaining between 400-500 pounds

  • Increase strength such as achieving a 400-pound front squat or 300-pound clean

  • Maintain or improve other performance metrics, such as speed, distance ran, handstand hold duration, etc.

My program runs with the quarters of each year—Q120 for example—and in the prior quarter I assess my goals, progress toward those goals, schedule, and other factors, such as stress. From this assessment, I create my next 13-week training program. I prefer a regularly varied program, meaning the specifics of my workouts change each week and I rarely have the exact same workout twice. That said, exercises repletion does occur as does recurrence of conditioning workouts, run distances, etc., but in the conjunction with variables that change the overall workout structure from previous workouts that included the same elements. The program is regularly varied, though a structure is present, but that structure may change from quarter to quarter. The program is goal-driven, meaning it only includes activities that move me toward my goal. Activities that do not support reaching goals are not included. The weekly structures is:

  • Day 1 – heavy lifting focusing on a squat, hip hinge, Olympic lifting exercises, and a pulling exercise. Rep ranges are low, though variable, and set volume varies over time.

  • Day 2 – one mile run followed by a conditioning work such as a 5 round couplet or 20-minute AMRAP.

  • Day 3 – this workout varies more than the others, but will include a pressing movement (which may be handstand push-up, dumbbell overhead presses, jerks, etc.) and a conditioning portion of some kind (AMRAP; 21,15, 9; couplet/triplet for rounds, etc.). It may include a short run (no more than three miles) or skill work (such as handstands).

  • Day 4 – always a no time limit AMRAP or 2-4 movements, with one movement a 400-meter run. An example is “no time limit AMRAP of 400m run, 10 toes to bar, 10 pull-ups. While the workout is not time limit, meaning I can go as long as short as desires, I generally try to complete a minimum of 8 rounds and no more than 24 rounds of the given movements.

  • Day 5 – this is a running only day during which I complete on of the following; 2-mile run, 5K, 8K, 10K, 9-mile run, or half-marathon. I based effort on how I feel.

We have a blog post and newsletter coming out in a few weeks that will go into more detail about our programs, so keep an out for that, where I will go into more detail about the training plans Grace and I use. Family

  • Maintain a healthy relationship with Grace and Amelia

  • Continue to improve myself as a person

  • Continue to build our wealth

When considering the relationships with Grace and Amelia, communication, understanding, cooperation, and hard work are the keys to success. I believe many people will understand how the first three apply, but my not grasp the “hard work” nature of building any relationship, including personal relationships. Indeed, some people may view me considering relationships as “hard work” to be a negative thing. Hard work is not a negative thing; it is core part of what creates long term relationships. Communication, understanding, and cooperation are not always easy, at times these areas are hard, and require hard work. In every serious, long term relationship, personal or professional, uncomfortable, and even anger inducing, issues arise. Being able to confront these subjects in a positive way takes hard work in that a person may not want to communicate, be understanding, or cooperate. In fact, an individual may want to do the exact opposite. Ultimately, for us to be happy as a family, we have to put hard work into that goal, the same as any other important goal, and in this instance that hard work will be the communication, understanding and cooperation. Continuing to improve myself means looking at my shortcomings through honest assessment; working on these areas for the better of myself as well as benefit of my family, clients, and colleagues; and understanding that I will always be who I am at the core, but that I can be the best version of that core person. To this end, I reflect on my actions, consider how my actions affect others, and determine if there is something I could have done better that day. I will never be perfect, but these steps help me be better. Building our wealth focuses more on the amounts we invest in traditional investments, real estate, and non-traditional investments such as cryptocurrency. Adding to these investments means making money, which comes through the various income streams we have from clients, dividends, and other forms of income. Adding to investments takes time and research, but we have most of our assets managed for us, with only a small portion of our investments managed by me directly. We have a long term plan, which for obvious reasons is something we will not share here. Investing an additional $150,000+ in the coming years is part of our immediate plan. Doubling business income over the next couple years and minimizing spending on things we do not need will support this goal, while the doubling of income would in itself allows to significantly exceed the target amount, given we do not significantly increase expenditures. While there are more details, such as our long term investment plan and five year rolling budget, the above provides some insight into our thoughts and planning as applied to building wealth. How I balance family, work, and fitness day to day Some people do not believe in work-life balance, but everyday people balance the various aspects of their life, including work. I do not chase some arbitrary work-life balance goal. For example, I do not say things like:

  • I am only going to work 40 hours

  • I will not work weekends

  • I will not work evenings

  • I will spend X hours with family per night

  • I will always have dinner with the family

These are fine goals to have and I am not speaking down about anyone who makes such goals. That said, such goals are not ideal for someone who runs a business. There is not work-life balance in that sense. Work does not start at 9:00 am and end at 5:00 pm. Work is ongoing as is personal life. In that sense, there is no such things as work-life balance in my life. Instead, I focus on making sure things are taken care of. That means I have quality time with my family, my clients are taken care of, projects are on task, etc. To do this, I “embrace the chaos.” By that I mean, I embrace the idea that I will not have perfect time slots for when I work or when I spend time with my family. That said, I do have a loose daily approach, which is:

  • Wake up between 2:30-3:30 am

  • Work or take care of personal tasks from 3:30 or 4:00 until 6:40

  • Spend time with the kiddo from 6:40 until 9:00

  • Work from 9:00-10:00

  • Workout from 10:00-11:00

  • Work from 11:00-2:00

  • Coach my wife from 2:00-2:30 (she does part of the workout on her own)

  • Work from 2:30-5:00

  • Spend time with the wife and kiddo from 5:00-8:30

  • Sleep from 9:00 to 2:30-3:30

This is the rough schedule I follow. It may change from day to day. To help me plan tasks, I have a have a structure for client management and other tasks. For example, I have set follow-ups for clients, daily reviews of workouts, set weekly business tasks (such as data back-ups), etc. I use a desktop calendar to help organize tasks. The training app we use sends me daily summaries of client activities and I sue the interface in the app to view these daily activities in detail. The use of a structure and this technology leaves little room for second guessing when tasks should be done. I do not have to depend on memory. The above schedule outline applies to Monday-Friday. On weekends I waked up later, but still before Grace and Amelia wake, which provides me uninterrupted time to complete tasks. After that, I plan to spend the day with them, handling tasks, such as client communications, as they arise. Focusing on efficiency is one of the biggest things I do to fit running a business, fitness, and family into my day. In my experience, people wo say “I’m too busy” either take on too much and need to clean out their schedule or they waste time (whether they think so or not). I focus on eliminating these excuses by being efficient and managing what I take on. For example, I use technology—such as the training app and calendar—to organize and streamline tasks. The calendar helps me organize while the training helps me do a number of tings, including streamline tasks, such a client sign-up, communication, and program creation. At the same time, I do not make a habit of wasting time with work. I get things done instead of procrastinating. I want to save my time wasting for hanging with the wife and kiddo (which is not a waste of time, but I think you get my point). Another example is minimizing the number of active projects. We always have marketing projects in place. Some things are ongoing, such as SEO, while others are periodic, such as website redesign. If I cannot take on another project, I will not take it one, no matter how important it may be. It will need to wait until I have the ability to effectively take it on, or I will contract it to someone else. Work-life balance, or any other phrase used to describe how a person balancing ongoing life, is all about management. Planning, efficiency, and hard work are what allow me to reach my goals, and the same things will help you reach your goals. You can reach any goal you want if you put the necessary focus and effort into it. So, go out there and reach goals and remember if you fail it is your fault, if you succeed, it is due to your effort.




Nathan DeMetz holds degrees in Exercise Science, Business Administration, and Information Technology as well as certifications in strength and conditioning, sports nutrition, run coaching, and other areas. His credentials come from organizations such as Indiana Wesleyan University, Ivy Tech College, and the International Sports Sciences Association. Nathan has 17 years of personal and professional experience in the health and fitness world. He works with people from across the globe, including locations such as Kuwait, Australia, and the USA. 

#fitness #goals #nutrition #gym #workout

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